Leaving a legacy to benefit generations to come

Leaving a legacy to benefit generations to come

Author, snake-catcher, committee president, manager of Landcare sites. These are just some of the hats Greg Calvert wears in his quest to make the environment a better place for all of us.

“Seeing degraded landscapes suffering from long-term neglect I started working on revegetating the riverbank behind my parents’ house,” Greg said.

“Since then I’ve volunteered with many groups including the North Queensland Herpetological Society, Society for Growing Australian Plants and Townsville Snake Catchers.” 

Greg was involved with Landcare from its inception as the Tropical Urban Production and Landcare Group that later merged with another to become the Coastal Dry Tropics Landcare Inc. 18 years on, he has served on the committees in various roles including as president of the Coastal Dry Tropics Landcare Inc.

“The work we do will leave behind a legacy that will endure for far longer than any of us. I like to think that the trees I plant will be appreciated by generations of people not yet born, “Greg said.

“It’s a quiet sort of work, very much out of the spotlight, a few hours on weekends, sometimes an hour after work. Whenever I get disheartened, I look back at photos and see how far we have come. I enjoy the company and camaraderie of like-minded people who work alongside towards a common goal.”

“Being able to inspire and encourage others to follow a similar path is probably the biggest positive impact I’ve ever had.”

Finding and completely eradicating several species of weeds before they were able to get established in Townsville has been one of the many highlights of Greg’s work.

He is most proud of co-authoring “Rare and Threatened plants of the Townsville-Thuringowa Region” for Coastal Dry Tropics Landcare in 1995, his first publication.

Greg said the skills and experience he has developed as a volunteer have helped immensely in his career as a botanist and ecologist. “I’ve met many friends along the way, and have enjoyed so many trips out bush collecting seeds, growing them, planting them and maintaining them.”

“In the high stress life of a PhD student and consultant, it’s nice to have somewhere I can burn off a bit of frustration chopping out weeds and getting away from the hustle and bustle to be among the forest I helped plant and grow.

It is very soothing, settling and calming to be in a place where you can reflect on what’s going on around you, shaded by a whole forest, where you helped bring life to every one of those tall trees. I always know that even if I dropped dead tomorrow, I’d leave behind something positive.”

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

From tuckshop mum to Volunteer Manager – a Happy Feat!

From tuckshop mum to Volunteer Manager – a Happy Feat!

From heating up meat pies to becoming a volunteer manager is all in a day’s work for Geri Bobbin.

Geri began volunteering in 2005 on her day off. She was one of only a handful of mums volunteering in the tuckshop at her daughter’s primary school.

This led to reading in class, helping with Mothers Day and Fathers Day activities, Christmas fundraisers, sports days and more.

She became a committee member and was then voted in as the treasurer at a theatre group she was part of. Geri then joined the Happy Feat family and a few years later was asked to take on the role of Volunteer Manager.

“Happy Feat provides around 41 local adults, all who have differing abilities a place to dance, have fun and socialise every week,” she said.

“It is a lot more than dancing, it’s a place to learn social engagement, teamwork and self worth.

“The Townsville community have embraced Happy Feat as their own. They are constantly being requested to attend a varying array of functions as performers or even as special guests.”

“Happy Feat gives so many opportunities to 41 people that they would never normally get to experience. They get to shine and to show their amazing abilities. Our team of carefully chosen volunteers demonstrate this with their love and nurturing to allow this to happen.”

Geri said the benefits she has gained from volunteering include experience in the workplace, learning new skills, building self-confidence and self-esteem, improving mental health and well-being, giving back to the community and finding purpose through meaningful activity.

“Becoming a part of the Happy Feat family has started a whole new chapter in my life.”

“Our Happy Featers teach me so much more than I could have ever imagined.

“Their acceptance, inclusiveness, empathy and honesty is infectious.

“I have made life long friendships with some of the most amazing human beings who give of their valuable time freely and consistently so that they can make a huge difference to others.

“Wednesday night is definitely the best night of the week.”

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Passionate dance & choreography teacher awarded for her positive impact

Passionate dance & choreography teacher awarded for her positive impact

She is an outstanding dancer and an outstanding volunteer. Oh, and she was awarded a State award for her work.

Rhiannon Hall was awarded The Volunteer Impact Award at the 2019 NQ Volunteer of the Year Awards.

Rhiannon said she had always been passionate about dancing and saw a perfect opportunity to give back to her community when a friend started a dance group for people with special needs, Happy Feat.

“As the Choreographer and Dance Teacher, my role is to create dances for people with differing abilities and various levels of mobility and concentration,” she said.

Rhiannon says she is empowered by the organisation’s ethos.

“Happy Feat gives people with special needs somewhere to shine. The impact that this group has on everyone is truly magical,” she said.

“Social skills and friendship, among other life skills are shared and encouraged as well as dancing. The community’s acceptance and response to our performances contributes significantly to the participant’s self-esteem and provides them with rich social engagement.”

Rhiannon said it was the people she met that made volunteering such a wonderful experience.

“I enjoy the fun I have with amazing people each week – feeling like I am making the smallest difference in someone’s day. I get to do something I love and give back to a community that needs it.”

A highlight at Happy Feat had being able to see how all the dancers evolve over time, she said.

They all blossom and shine after just a few weeks of coming. I feel so honoured that I get to share a little piece of their lives.”

She is most proud of the fact she took 35 dancers and their parents and careers to the Special Olympic Asia Pacific Games and perform at the opening ceremony.

“We flew everyone to Newcastle so they could experience this once-in-life time-experience. I am always incredibly proud as a dance teacher to see them performing but this one would have to be the most emotional and heart warming.”

Her advice to to anyone considering volunteering is straightforward.

“Just do it – no matter what it is, you get so much enjoyment out of helping people and being a part of a team. It adds so much fun and fulfilment to your life.”

She said the organisation felt like family now.

“You get to know everyone who walks through the door. We make time to catch up and share our experiences of the night.”

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Busy volunteer is the epitome of generosity and community spirit

Busy volunteer is the epitome of generosity and community spirit

She helps parents borrow toys for their children – Elmo and Raggedy Ann may be included.

Sue Gardner was a deserving nominee for The Heart of Volunteering Award in the 2019 NQ Volunteer of the Year Awards.

Sue said she first started volunteering in 2015 after her husband passed away.

“It was not long after I retired from teaching so I needed to keep busy,” she said.

“My daughter showed me information about the Pyjama Foundation which seemed to fit with my teaching experience.”

“I mentor a cherub for one hour once per week and also look after the resource room. I am still with the Pyjama Foundation and I volunteer at the Townsville Toy Library.”

She also knits ‘knockers’ for the Townsville branch of the PJF and volunteers at the Blood Bank usually once a month. She is also Secretary of the Probus Club of Townsville Inc.

“With the PJF I am helping foster children experience success at school, at the Toy Library I help families borrow toys for their children I knit knockers to support women who have mastectomies and at the Probus Club we help seniors socialise,” she said

At each organisation, Sue feels a valuable part of the team.

“In each organisation I meet people who have the same values as me and they make me feel I am doing something worthwhile for the community,” she said.

“I am helping others and helping make the local community a better place to live.”

Being nominated and celebrating with the other amazing people also nominated for awards at the inaugural North Queensland Volunteer of the Year Awards was a highlight, Sue said.

The Pyjama Foundation named her an “Angel” of the year in 2018.

Volunteering has helped her grow as a person, she said.

“You wonder when you retire how to fill the days but by volunteering life becomes busy but in a good way.”

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Regeneration and cultural development a healthy focus

Regeneration and cultural development a healthy focus

She knew what she wanted from a young age. Bernadette had an interest in cultural development and wanted to be part of a proactive community.

“I wanted to learn new skills and find meaningful and productive ways to express myself and promote culture in my community,” she said.

Bernadette Boscacci started volunteering at 4TTT Community Radio in 1983 as High School Program Coordinator. She went on to volunteer with the Youth Network, Palm Creek Festival and the Golden Bee Project where she continues to volunteer.

“I got to travel to Sweden in 2017 to represent Golden Bee Australia in an International Art Market in Stockholm,” Bernadette said.

Now also volunteering at Mundy Creek Landcare (CDTLI), Garbutt & Kowanyama Culture & Research Centre, in Kowanyama and remotely, Bernadette cites the regeneration of Mundy Creek Garbutt as one of the many highlights of her volunteering story.

“It’s very satisfying to see the continued growth of the trees we planted and all the benefits that flow from this – the birds and animals that visit or inhabit the area, the increased shade and physical beauty,” she said.

“I am particularly proud of the work I have lead at Mundy Creek. Also, the production of Alma Luke’s Bush Medicine Book which fulfilled an elder woman’s longstanding aspiration to write and publish a book for her community and the world about the healing powers of her traditional lands and its natural resources.”

“Whenever I become involved in community and contribute my skills and time to activities and projects that I know help to make the world a better, happier place to live in, I experience increased health and well-being. I meet many amazing people and experience a myriad of things that I would not otherwise experience had I stayed at home and focussed on my own small world.

“Volunteering is about making a commitment to something bigger than ourselves and our own insular world. When we work together collaboratively and collectively, opportunities arise, we achieve goals and our lives and communities are changed and enriched.

In short, it has brought me new and valuable relationships, opened my mind, toned my muscles, honed my skills and gladdened my heart.”

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Caring for the land helps this volunteer develop social skills

Caring for the land helps this volunteer develop social skills

Learning about the nursery, weeding and washing pots out was all it took for Levi to fall in love with caring for the land.

In Year 10 at high school, as part of the Work Readiness program to prepare for work after school, Levi Carlton had to choose a Volunteer position. He started volunteering in January 2015 with Landcare, Bundaberg through the Bundaberg Special School.

He is now volunteering at Landcare Townsville, and completing a 20-week Traineeship with CVA.

“Landcare has a Nursery and it is open to the Public on Fridays, I like helping people to choose their plants, “ he said.

He currently does various things within the nursery and also roams to various sites.

“Everyone is friendly and we all pitch in and help each other. I love being in the outdoors and being part of the environment, I like to use my kayak sometimes and clean the rubbish in the river.”

Levi said there have been a lot of highlights over the years in volunteering.

“An achievement or contribution that I am most proud of is using recycled timber from an old picnic table and creating a tea/coffee table from it for the Landcare Nursery Townsville,” he said.

I have a disability and I have always been withdrawn from others and never liked to be the one to strike up a conversation, he said.

“Volunteering has helped me socialise. I have found over the years of volunteering that I have become more self-confident and gained a wealth of knowledge and I am learning new things all the time.

“I find Volunteering for Landcare at times can be a calming tool for me.”

Anyone considering volunteering should just go for it, he says.

“It makes you feel good and worthwhile when you’re out in the environment and meeting new friends, there are always different things happening and new things to learn,” he said.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Volunteer with a big heart making a difference

Volunteer with a big heart making a difference

Having a cuppa with seniors is one of Lori Langford’s favourite things to do.

Lori started volunteering because she said she wanted to connect with people as well as improve her work skills.

First volunteering with the Endeavour Foundation in retail, she then moved on to the North Townsville Community Hub in Deeragun where she wears many hats – cleaner, flood recovery worker, child minder, events coordinator and social media advocate, all whilst providing much needed emotional support.

“It’s an amazing experience to see the kids learn various skills when we have school holiday programs.”

Lori said volunteering at North Townsville Community Hub really fulfilled her. “They are willing to teach me operating procedures; they allow me to try different job duties while providing training and support. They are encouraging, uplifting, and very supportive,” she said.

“My goal for a while has been to try and get our Seniors Cuppa Chat numbers up and August 2nd we had 25 in attendance. Our desire is to help our seniors combat loneliness so that they can live happier more fulfilling lives. Getting the numbers up has been extremely satisfying.”                                                    

“Goodness, it’s hard to pick a highlight of my volunteering experience however I would say being able to help folks with basic needs during the floods was definitely a highpoint,” she said.

Lori said she enjoyed being able to make a difference in people’s lives. It is clear she has done that, receiving The Heart of Volunteering Award at the 2019 NQ Volunteer of the Year Awards.

Her advice for anyone considering volunteering is quite simple.

“Look for an organisation that interests you, apply for volunteer work and get in there and give it your all because they really need the help and bloom where you’re planted.”

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

15-year-old Trayeden Fulmer’s initiative helps community in need

15-year-old Trayeden Fulmer’s initiative helps community in need

With communities across much of Australia impacted by bushfires and memories still fresh in our minds of the unprecedented monsoonal event that caused Townsville’s flooding in 2019, the remarkable contribution of volunteers in times of need never fails to inspire.

Who will ever forget the images of the fire blackened faces of the volunteers tirelessly and selflessly battling the recent bushfires, or those showing the brave volunteers wading through rising floodwaters to rescue people from their homes in Townsville? These inspiring volunteers have touched us and left us in awe of their community spirit.

During this anniversary of the monsoonal event, let’s also remember the many unseen individuals who stepped up and made a difference in our community. Here is the story of one such individual, Trayeden Fulmer, just 15-years old at the time. [Photo above L to R: Trayeden Fulmer and his social media based task force team].

It was in February 2019 while assisting a friend with the cleanup of his property following the severe weather event that Trayeden showed great initiative and found a way to help the many residents requiring assistance.

Trayeden explains I was motivated to create a Facebook group that soon become a platform for people to offer their time to assist with the clean up as well as providing an avenue for residents to reach out for help. The Facebook group played an important role in helping Townsville clean up and recover. I believe the group showed the true Australian spirit that lives within us all and eased the burden on the individuals who had their homes inundated.

My time coordinating my group of volunteers and the clean up efforts was an amazing experience. The willingness of the volunteers mixed with the gratefulness of the residents we were able to help was an emotionally filled time and is something I will cherish for the rest of my life. The smiles we were able to put on the faces of those who had just lost everything, and the comradery amongst the community, was a highlight, and something I am extremely proud of. That I was able to have such an impact on the community at such a young age is one of the greatest achievements of my life and it has given me a sense of pride within my community.

My journey as a volunteer has allowed me to grow significantly as a person. There were some emotionally hard times after seeing the destruction caused by the floods and seeing so many sentimental items lost was mentally tough to experience as a 15-year-old. It has taught me so much; how to positively contribute to others, how to communicate with people and provide support during such an emotional time and it gave me purpose as I was able to work toward a positive cause!”

To anyone considering volunteering, my advice is, just give it a go. As a 15-year-old, I never thought my actions could help so many people and support a community but I discovered any contribution, no matter how big or small, could change the life of someone. The feeling you get after helping someone is indescribable, so just give it a go. You won’t regret it!

If you are interested in helping out at times of need, register your interest at Subscribe to connect with organisations providing coordinated activities.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Volunteering led me to a full time paid job

Volunteering led me to a full time paid job

After completing a degree in graphic design and struggling to find work for several years, I decided to broaden my skills by completing a Certificate III in Community Services. It was here that I was introduced to the idea of volunteering in my community. One of the opportunities that I found was an administration position with VNQ. I was fortunate enough to also use my graphic design skills to assist with Communications. I am grateful to VNQ for giving me the chance to advance my admin skills with my limited experience in this area. I believe it is the skills I’ve gained and my experience in this very position for the last seven months which has led me to a full time paid administration position in Townsville. Thanks Volunteering North Queensland!
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

VNQ found me my perfect position

VNQ found me my perfect position

My first fling with volunteering was through VNQ for the Glendi festival 2018 helping with surveys and ad hoc tasks. Not only did I get food vouchers for amazing Greek feasts throughout the day, my dog did as well. Hanging out with my dog all day, talking to the community, and eating Greek food is hardly work. That’s how it all started. The following month I spent stalking the VNQ position listings where I found my perfect position as an English teacher for refugee families. I previously worked as an English teacher overseas and VNQ gave me an amazing opportunity to reopen that career path that I enjoyed so much and I have not looked back.
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn